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Jersey Library Lunchtime Lecture: Censorship during the war

19 Jul 2017

The Second World War had an enormous effect on Jersey, one that you can see every day in the bunkers and tunnels that dot the landscape. Our beloved Pomme d’Or became a building of strategic importance to the occupying forces, converted to the German naval headquarters due to the perfect vantage point overlooking the harbour. A view you can still admire from the Harbour Room.

The effects of the occupation on islanders weren't, however, limited to the physical. There were enormous social consequences as a result of the 'Paper War' that characterised the approach to occupation favoured by the Nazi forces.

Waging war with bureaucracy and the Propaganda machine

The term "Paper War" refers to the rules, laws and immense bureaucratic administration that the Nazi forces imposed upon islanders and which changed the nature of life in Jersey for far longer than the war itself.

Perhaps the most obvious example of this was the censorship of Jersey media throughout the period of occupation. Jersey's reporters, editors and printers had no choice but to comply with the Nazi authorities' demands for information that conformed to the aims of their Europe-wide propaganda machine.

A rich social and natural history

The story of censorship in Jersey during the occupation is a fascinating one, and is certainly worth listening to on Friday 21 July at 13:10 in the Jersey Library in Halkett Place. The talk lasts for just 40 minutes. But we guarantee that, even in such a short time, you will learn a lot.

The talk is free of charge and is being delivered by Julie O’Grady, Senior Librarian, at the Jersey Library. Julie plans to cover the nature of the censorship itself as well as the effects it had on daily life.

After the talk, continue to rediscover the island’s wartime history at the Pomme with a relaxing drink in the Cafe Bar 

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